Wide Plank Flooring Home

Nov 7th

Wide plank flooring – Hardwood wide plank flooring is an old-fashioned look that comes back in style these days. Best of all, it’s actually a little easier to lie than thinner floorboards, because you have to put fewer planks. You can put these types of floors in a bathroom, but as with any type of flooring, you have to cut around the toilet drain, which can be complicated if you have never been dismantled a toilet before. Be sure to get prefinished, high-gloss planks, so they will stand up against moisture in a bathroom.

Wide Plank Flooring Plan
Wide Plank Flooring Plan

Instructions

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Wide plank flooring with turn off the water pipe behind the toilet. Use a wrench to disconnect the line from the tank. Remove the two floor bolts that hold down the toilet base. Wear the toilet out of the room. There will be an open toilet drain left in the floor. Lay paper underlayment over the floor, in overlapping courses. Staple it down. Snap the starting line with your chalk Snap Line; place it 1/2 inch from the wall where you should start. (Note: You should usually start on the longest free edge of the floor, do not start along the wall closest to the toilet drain.)

Set the first wide plank flooring board at one end of the starting line, with the needle’s ribbed edge against the wall. Nail down with your floor nail gun; shoot the nails through the top each foot along both sides of the board. Put a second board away at the end of the first; assemble them with their pointed ends. Nail the other card in the same way. Repeat, if the entire first course of boards along the starting line, so there is a half-inch space through the wall. Use a saw to cut the last board as needed to fit the end. Add the second course next to the first; lock the boards together of their spun pages. Arrange the boards in a zigzag configuration with the first course, so the ends do not crash between courses. Attach boards the second and subsequent courses by pushing nails through the sides of boards at an inner angle rather than through the top.